Friday, October 22, 2004

Dichotomy of Print Versus Electronic Journalism

I have a question.

I used to have a theory that a Print Journalism major can do broadcast journalism with fair ease: that it is just a bunch of wiring know-how and field experience. I was convinced that if you can write, you can do anything, including reading your writing to a camera and crew. But now I'm not so sure. Eventually, I want to do both. Or at least avert the proverbial "slamming door" of not getting the right degree for undergrad. I want to produce news.

1. What are the pros/ cons of Electronic to Print Journalism and vice-versa? Is one more marketable than the other? I've been told that the most money could be made in the newspaper business, is this true?

2. What direction is the news headed? Are "newspapers" on the verge of extinction? Should I consider this into my curriculum?


3 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

This is a very good question to ask. I'm a student in high school for the final year and I'm very interested in journalism and broadcasting with hopes of one day becoming an anchor at a news station and I have a few question for the college students on your site.

1. I hear that the salary of most broadcast journalist isn't much - so how much does the average news anchor make?

2. I also hear that its hard to find a job as a journalist in broadcasting? If true how do you get your foot in the door?

3. I've also heard that taking basic college courses a techincal college like midlands tech and then transfer saves time and money - is this a good idea for a college student in your opinion?

Thanks...

9:10 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

This is a very good question to ask. I'm a student in high school for the final year and I'm very interested in journalism and broadcasting with hopes of one day becoming an anchor at a news station and I have a few question for the college students on your site.

1. I hear that the salary of most broadcast journalist isn't much - so how much does the average news anchor make?

2. I also hear that its hard to find a job as a journalist in broadcasting? If true how do you get your foot in the door?

3. I've also heard that taking basic college courses a techincal college like midlands tech and then transfer saves time and money - is this a good idea for a college student in your opinion?

Thanks...

9:11 AM  
Blogger Doug Fisher said...

I've done a broader post to answer most of your questions. As to the question about Midlands Tech. It can be effective, but only if you make sure the courses you take will transfer to the college in which you eventually hope to enroll. That means doing some -- perhaps a lot -- of research beforehand (but you're an aspiring journalist, right; so now is the time to dig in and do some "reporting.") Get syllabuses of the courses you would expect to take at the community collge. Then check with the student services office at the college you plan to eventually attend. At USC, the j-school has a student services offices with some of the most helpful people you'll meet. Ask them what courses would be accepted; they may already have a list from other students who have transferred. If not, give them a copy of the syllabus and ask if the professor who teaches a similar course at the college will review it (the prof usually has to certify it meets all the requirements of the college's course). The downside is that you don't get to wander over to the j-school, look around, introduce yourself and meet people -- something I think every freshman and sophomore should do. I'm amazed at how many don't even go on our Web site to look at the instructors' backgrounds to find one with similar interests. Many, if asked, would be happy to be mentors.

3:38 PM  

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